Shadows & Grace, a video blog by S. Olga Wittekind

In continuation of last week’s video blog on the “Journey to Wholeness,” S. Olga Wittekind offers more insight this week into the Jungian concept of the shadow, and how through God’s grace we may grow in wholeness by acknowledging and integrating our less favorable personal attributes.

S. Olga Wittekind, OSF, is a Franciscan Sister, Jungian Psychologist, Spiritual Director, and the Director of the Oldenburg Franciscan Center, where she focuses on helping individuals of all faiths grow in wholeness through spirituality & psychology.

COMING SOON at OLDENBURG FRANCISCAN CENTER:
Blame & Shame

Journey into Wholeness, a video by S. Olga Wittekind

At Oldenburg Franciscan Center, we often have retreats that touch upon the idea of “growing into wholeness.”  In this video, S. Olga Wittekind, PhD, OSF, (director of Oldenburg Franciscan Center, counselor, spiritual director, and former psychology professor) talks about what that means!

Wisdom Has Set Your Table, by S. Karla Barker, OSF

Gathering with family or friends at a meal is always a special time.  If you are someone who often eats alone, it can evoke thoughts and memories.  The thought from Scripture, “Wisdom has set your table,” gives all of us something to reflect on.

How has Wisdom set our table?  What’s the menu?

Often today we hear others say, “I’ve got enough on my plate already.”  You can be certain it’s not food!  In most cases, it’s a complaint.

Perhaps we can request from the Spirit that sets our table to bring on the bowls of laughter and humor.  Maybe silverware of good conversation and justice sharing.  Perhaps a plate full of pride that’s grateful for all the good of the day wouldn’t be half bad either.

A change of menu could mean no pounds, but certainly a lighter and happier heart.

Blessings,

S. Karla Barker, OSF
Sisters of St. Francis, Oldenburg, IN

Reflection for Pentecost, by S. Maureen Irvin, OSF

First Reading: Acts 2:1-11
Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 12:3-7, 12-13
Gospel: John 20:19-23

REFLECTION:
Today we celebrate the Feast of Pentecost, the birthday of the Church. And what a joyous feast it is! The readings speak of our birthright as Christians. They encourage letting go of fear; being at peace; welcoming the amazing power, gifts and surprises of the Spirit; stretching boundaries and forgiving. This feast calls for energy, new life, amazing possibilities. We are not to be paralyzed by fear, structures, laws, criticism, stereotypes, past hurts, misunderstandings. We are alive in and filled with the powerful Spirit of God! We are called, inspired, encouraged and sustained by the gifts of the Spirit: wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety and fear (wonder, awe) of God.

  • What is keeping me from experiencing the powerful gifts of the Holy Spirit?
  • Of what gift am I most in need at this time?
  • Do I recognize that my gifts are not given for my use alone, but for the good of all?
  • How can I re-energize my faith in the Spirit of God?

PRAYER:
Spirit of God, come upon us anew as you did the early disciples on Pentecost. Shake us up and energize us for the work of sharing our gifts with all in love and compassion. Creative Wind, blow where you will, clearing away what is tired and worn and discouraged! Give us new life and energy for the challenging days ahead. Come Holy Spirit. Renew the face of the earth!
Amen.

S. Maureen Irvin, OSF
Sisters of St. Francis, Oldenburg

Blessings on your weekend!

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Inchworm, by Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF

Old movies hold a special charm for me.  I enjoy the simplicity of the story line, the development of characters on screen, and the music.  New movies don’t have the same charm for me.  INVICTUS comes closest to what I call a really good movie.

I must admit that the musicals sometimes bog down into much music and not enough dialogue, but still there is something…maybe I am just getting old.

Some time ago I saw and old Danny Kaye movie on TV.  The story was a fictionalized account of Hans Christian Anderson’s life.  It was delightful to see how “Hans” could help a child who was different by telling the story in song about the Ugly Duckling.  Another time he eased the loneliness of a little girl by singing the tale Thumbelina. But the one short song that seemed to be inserted as an afterthought was Inchworm.  The melody has been going through my head, and I have a tendency to poke around in my thoughts to see why it is making an impact.  In the song, the inchworm is addressed:

Inchworm, inchworm,
Measuring the marigolds,
Seems to me you’d stop and see
How beautiful they are!

We had a short winter this year and spring came very soon, even before we had the chance to tire of the snow, of the cold, of the barrenness of the trees.  Some of us missed watching the snowflakes dancing and the glistening white of the snowfall.  But all of that is put aside.  We have forgotten it, because we have the loveliness of spring.

I know there are some of us, who hope the spring will quickly give way to summer.  We will have put aside the buds on trees, the daffodils, and forsythia.  We would like to make things move faster to get rid of the very things we welcomed not so long ago. The difference is not in the snow or the buds.  The difference is in us. We welcome the snow of Thanksgiving and Christmas, but we do not like the snow of Easter. We delighted in the buds of spring, but we long for the roses and shade trees of summer.

Something very similar happens in our relationships; we welcome the differences we see in our new employee or caregiver.  But as time goes by those very things that seemed so great in her or him look different now.  The Employer or Patient inchworm measures everything, but doesn’t stop to see how beautiful the differences are.  This is also true of the marital inchworm.  A Spouse measures but does not look at beautiful differences.

We delight in our children, but if one of them decides to follow a path that is not in OUR game plan, or brings home a significant other who is definitely not significant to us, we measure with our own tape, with our own mindset and do not see how beautiful the relationship can be.

We also take things for granted.  The paper is to be at our door by 6:30 AM.  When it is not there, we are unset, disgruntled, maybe even downright nasty about it.  We do not even care WHY it is late.  We do not want to know of a crisis the distributor may have had.  We just want it when we want it.

From the time we awaken in the morning until the time we crawl in bed at night we are surrounded by things and happenings that we take for granted.  Try making a list of things in this category.  To begin with, you take it for granted that you will wake up!  Then you take it for granted that water will flow when you turn the tap that the water will be safe to drink, that the water will flow down the drain, that the hot water will be hot and the cold water, cold.  We expect that there will be food for breakfast, coffee or tea or orange juice.  We take it for granted that the car will start.  We expect to see each other when the work day is over. And so on and on and on.

If we think now and then about how many people must do things to make our day go smoothly, we might have a different attitude about what happens.

Here is an example.  We turn on the tap and fill a glass with water.  In the Gospels Jesus says, “Anyone who gives a cup of cold water because of Christ, will receive a reward.”  Now if you work for the water company and make the intention of providing water for people in Jesus name, you have a good chance of getting a whopper of a reward.  After all it only takes a cup, and you are providing hundreds of gallons.  But you have to think about it.  Those of us who turn the tap would do well to remember that water made us Christians in Baptism, and your work for the water company keeps us clean, provides means for cooking and is a delight for warm summer days as we boat, fish and swim.

If on the other hand, we measure the gift of water only by the cost of the bill at the end of the month, we are like the inchworm measuring but not seeing what we measure.

When you must measure, be sure to look for the beautiful things. Do not be like the inchworm finding purpose in the signs rather than the message.

You are beautiful to God and to me!

Peace and Joy,

S.  Sharonlu, OSF

Clip art courtesy of http://www.gardenclipart.net/

Washing of Feet, by Barbara Leonhard, OSF

Photograph © Margaret Lois Jansen

Don’t be afraid to let me love you just as you are.

I know the journey you’ve been on.
Every step of it is precious to me.

As I wash your feet, I acknowledge and bless steps taken with courageous stride;
slow, hesitant, barely inching forward steps, and even the dragging of feet.

Your feet tell the story of your journey,
how long you have been on the way; the stumbling blocks you’ve tripped over;
the moments of slip-sliding down some hill you thought you’d climbed once and for all;
and the determined digging in of toes as you learned to begin anew.

In the washing of your feet, I hold your inner journey as well.

Don’t be afraid to let me love you just as you are:
exhausted or exuberant, anxious or peaceful, discouraged or hopeful.

As I bathe your feet, I bless you for every step you have taken,
the ones others have seen and the ones only you know about –
those costly steps toward forgiveness, understanding, or softening of heart.

I honor even the steps that you thought of as missteps
or walking in circles, or meandering in confusion.
Every step you have taken is precious to me.

I bless you for the journey that is still yours to make.
Each step you take, whether bold or limping,
dancing or stiff,
is sacred.

As I wash your feet
and hold in my hands all the stories that they tell,
I silently pray that no matter where your journey takes you,
you will remember that I am with you
loving you
just as you are.

***

Washing of Feet © Barbara Leonhard, OSF

Barbara Leonhard, OSF is a theologian, spiritual director, and retreat leader at Oldenburg Franciscan Center.  She is a lover of scripture and loves to share the Good News with others.

Please contact center@oldenburgosf.com with any requests for permission to reproduce Washing of Feet.
Please visit http://www.smallsmallacts.com for information on licensing of images or purchase of prints by Lois.

Resurrection, by Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF

Resurrection of trees at Springtime

Most of us, when we hear the word “resurrection” will think of Easter and Jesus’ return from the dead or the final judgment when all will rise from the dead.  Perhaps it is because at the time a person dies, grief at the loss of someone dear blocks out other emotions. To find a way of keeping our focus on the resurrection each of us will experience would be, in my opinion, a great way of seeing beyond the bodily death.  Our beloved parent, child or friend lives on.

Death is like birth.  A baby spends 9 months in the mother’s womb developing a body that will be able to thrive on the earth.  Then with much pain and trauma to both baby and mother, the child is born.  We spend 50, 70, 99 years on this earth developing a soul that will be able to see God.  Then with varying amounts of pain we will be birthed into the heavenly atmosphere leaving the people we loved and who loved us still in development.  These people have been part of our spiritual development, and they will grieve at not being able to see us.  But if the thought of the resurrection were daily reviewed, grief can be lessened.

Take look at the trees. In the winter the trees seem dead.  In fact, a visitor from New Guinea remarked about how fortunate we were to have so much firewood at hand!  She could not imagine these trees coming to life again in the spring.  Happily she was still visiting in the spring and could see the “resurrection” of the trees.

We humans cannot see the resurrection of our loved ones, but we would do well to remember they will rise.  They have spent their lives developing a spiritual life, even if they are not cognizant of doing it.  We are here to prepare for heaven.  Most of us will do a pretty fair job of it.  Some of us will do a magnificent preparation.  Others may not do so well.  But what you end up with when the spiritual birthing time comes is what you have been developing all your life.

Some people have lived in an atmosphere that nurtured the spiritual development day by day.  Maybe your home of origin was like that.  Some people did not get conscious of the need to nurture his/her spiritual nature until adulthood.  And there are some who never caught the need to nurture it.

Please note that I did not say religious life.  The spirit, the soul, can be nurtured in many ways, sometimes without religion.  If you equate religious with spiritual, you may have a different definition of spiritual.

I have heard of young persons who heard nothing of God or Jesus, but grew up with a strong sense that there was something more to life.  Their way of living could put me to shame.  Their sense of the spiritual was alive and strong, and that sense developed their souls even though they knew nothing of God, Jesus, the Holy Spirit, redemption.  I often think if we could bring that knowledge to them, they would be saintly giants.

Reflecting on what our life is all about and how we are nurturing our souls for heaven will bring us to thoughts of our resurrection and will probably help strengthen our spiritual life.

Peace and Joy to all as we approach the magnificent resurrection of Jesus. It is because of HIM that we are assured about our own resurrection.

S. Sharonlu

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S. Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF has a background in education, child development, and family ministries, and her wisdom is now at work at Oldenburg Franciscan Center.  She has worked as a teacher, school administrator, and as Director of Family Life Services for two dioceses.  Sr. Sharonlu has long been an advocate for children and puts her heart into helping parents build and sustain healthy family relationships.  One of her most memorable ministries has been with the people of Red Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota, where her heart still lies.

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Of St. Francis & Brother Ruffino, by S. Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF

Oldenburg Franciscan Center

photo: Oldenburg Sunset

Of St. Francis & Brother Ruffino

Brother Ruffino was so absorbed in God he noticed nothing external.  He seldom spoke, and even when he did, he never had a gift for speaking.  Even though this was true, one day St. Francis ordered him to preach to the people.  Ruffino, surprised, asked that another friar be sent in his place.

To this St. Francis answered, “Because you did not obey immediately, take off your mantle and habit.” (This left Ruffino in his underwear!)   “Now go to Assisi and preach to the people in the church.  Do this out of holy obedience.”

Ruffino obeyed, and when he entered the church and went to the pulpit, people laughed at him saying, “These men do such penance that they are out of their minds.”

Seeing how quickly Ruffino, one of the noblest men of Assisi, obeyed the harsh command, Francis reproached himself, saying: “How could you, a humble son of a merchant send the distinguished Ruffino to preach as if he were a madman?  You shall do the same thing you have ordered him to do.”  And immediately he took off his mantle and habit, and went to Assisi, carrying his mantle and Ruffino’s with him.  People, seeing him in his underwear, believed he and Ruffino had truly lost their minds through too much penance.

Ruffino was preaching when Francis ascended the pulpit and began to preach on holy penance, on voluntary poverty, and on the nakedness of Christ and the shame of his Passion, so that all began to weep and were edified by the action of Ruffino and St. Francis.

✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝  ✝

If you have ever “punished” someone, and realized how out of sync that was with the insult or mistake or… (fill in the blank), you might think how Francis inflicted himself with the same punishment he doled out!

Lent is here. We are asked to find that within ourselves that hampers God’s growth in us, and resolve to erase, scrape or cut it away to make more room for God.  Don’t make the mistake of judging your worth by looking at others who have done less. Remember, of the one who has been given much, more will be required.  And let the cross of ashes put on your forehead on Ash Wednesday be a proclamation to the world that you are getting rid of anything that keeps you from fully relying on God.

Peace in your penance,

S. Sharonlu, OSF

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Sr. Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF has a background in education, child development, and family ministries.  She has worked as a teacher, school administrator, and as Director of Family Life Services for two dioceses.  Sr. Sharonlu has long been an advocate for children and puts her heart into helping parents build and sustain healthy family relationships.  One of her most memorable ministries has been with the people of Red Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota, where her heart still lies.

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Take a Lenten Journey with Us!

Join the Oldenburg OSF Sisters in our upcoming Lenten series at the Oldenburg Franciscan Center:

March 1, 8, 15, 22 (Thursdays) 6:30-8pm
Lenten Series: Four Contemporary Stories of Discovering One’s Way
with Sr. Barbara Leonhard, OSF

Re-discover your call to discipleship!  During this Lenten series, we will look to four very real people who were drawn to discover and re-discover what discipleship was calling them to do.  Hearing their stories and the questions that would not let them go can prompt us to listen more closely to the call of discipleship in our own lives.  We will focus on one example per week:

March 1: Howard Thurman – a black minister, teacher, and mystic who established the first radically integrated intercultural church in the United States.

March 8: Edith Stein – a Jewish teacher, scholar, and mystic who became a Catholic and entered a Carmelite monastery.  She died in Auschwitz in 1942.

March 15: Thomas Kelly
– a Quaker teacher and seeker who discovered a mystical depth within himself and set about drawing others to their spiritual depths.

March 22: Jean Vanier
– Canadian founder of L’Arche Communities who has dedicated his life energies to creating homes and sharing life with those with developmental disabilities.

$15/session or $50 for the complete Lenten series. 
Or, come one evening and bring a friend, 2 for $25.
RSVP to Annette at center@oldenburgosf.com or 812-933-6437.

We hope to see you soon!

Salt of Earth & A New Morning Song by Angela Roesler

March 3rd is coming around the corner, and our gifted Storyteller and Experiential Retreat Leader, S. Karla Barker, OSF will be honoring us with her reflective program, “What does it mean to be Salt of Earth?”

S. Karla’s retreats touch the soul through her most beautiful ways of helping others integrate beliefs and life experiences with imagery and rituals that enrich our spirits in deep and unexpected ways.

Last year, I posted this poem and reflection (shown below) on my personal blog.  I am sharing it with you today to give you an idea for the profoundly peaceful impact a single morning with S. Karla had on me, long before I worked for our retreat center!

I hope you’ll enjoy it, and I hope you’ll consider joining us on Saturday, March 3rd from 9-11:30 a.m. at the Oldenburg Franciscan Center for a peaceful day of retreat and personal discovery. We’ll discover the ways we can both savor and add zest to the life we’ve been given, and we’ll find encouragement in sharing our distinctive flavor as Salt of Earth so that others may relish our gentleness, creativity, and love of Life!

RSVP to 812-933-6437 or center@oldenburgosf.com!

Peace & joy to all,
Angela Roesler
Oldenburg Franciscan Center

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Dear Shadow, Come Home ~ A New Morning Song

Poet’s preamble:  There is a Native American tradition that teaches its children that when we sleep at night our shadow runs off to chase our dreams.  In the morning before children rise and let their feet hit the floor, they are taught to whistle or sing for their shadow to come home.  Upon hearing the call, their shadow will return and reunite with them.  If they forget to do this, however, their shadow will remain in a distant dreamland, and the person will go through the day separated from an integral piece of their soul, and they will not be whole or fully present to give or receive what is needed that day.

I learned of this tradition while attending a program on Native American Spirituality given by S. Karla Barker, a Sister of St. Francis in Oldenburg, IN, and the story resonated deeply within my heart.  The poem and artwork that you find here are like prayers – calling my shadow home through difficult – and peaceful – times.

Dear Shadow, Come HomeArtwork:  Dear Shadow, Come Home

Poem: A New Morning Song
(Thanks to Sister Karla, OSF – Oldenburg)

Can you hear
The beat of the drum,
Dear shadow?
Come home.

The sun is
Arisin’ and 
I’m on my own.
Come home.

The world’s
Unfamiliar
And we’re full of dreams.
Come home.

Return and
Stand tall as the
New morning gleams.
Come home.

At night while
I’m sleeping,
We’ll ride your white steed.
Come home.

And you’ll
Keep me dreaming
So we’ll never need.
Come home.

But a new day
Is callin’ and
We must be true.
Come home.

You must follow me
I cannot
Follow you.
Come home.

Together we are
And together
We’ll be.
Come home.

And we’ll
Keep on seeking
Responsibly: free.
Come home.

My spirit, my shadow,
My heart,
And my guide,
My presence, my love,
My hope and my pride,

A new day is dawning;
Together we’ll ride.

Come home.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Artistic notes:   As for the artwork, I created this one weekend while on a mini retreat at a dear friend’s house.  She suggested that we do decoupage – to see through art where the Spirit might be moving within us.  I stayed up past 1am putting mine together, totally into the process.  I still love the images I discovered.  And while it might look like a bunch of random hodge-podge to others, to me, it speaks gently and happily to my soul.  If you want to make one of your own, it’s easy!

  • Paint a background on canvas with 1 or 2 colors… you can do a design, but it’s not necessary.  Pick color(s) that speak to you.
  • Choose a word or phrase that has particular meaning or a ‘catch’ for you right now and paint it on the canvas.  (i.e. Mine was “Dear shadow, come home.”  My friend’s was “Alacrity”)
  • Get out some old magazines and newspapers and start flipping and clipping out images that speak to you.
  • Arrange the images you cut out and adhere them to canvas with Modge Podge (or a similar project glue).  We first painted the surface of our (dried) canvas with the Modge Podge, placed our cut-out pictures one by one on the gluey surface, then painted another layer of glue on top of each picture.
  • Let it dry!  See what you think….. :)

Last but not least, I encourage you to come to the Burg on Saturday, March 3rd to spend a morning of reflection with S. Karla!  Come learn more about yourself and how God created you to be Salt of Earth!  She’s a wonderful retreat director!  Call 812-933-6437 or email aroesler@oldenburgosf.com for more information!

© ~AMNR~ 2011

Giants and Children, by Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF

Photography © Angela Roesler

Guess what!  Giants are fantasy and children are real!

Saint Augustine was a giant in his day and still is today: brilliant, scholarly, and very wise.  Yet, his mother, Saint Monica, prayed for this child of hers because he could not believe what he could not take apart and prove.  He lacked the trust and faith of a child.  Once Augustine opened the door to truths he could not prove, he found joy.

His faith, newly found, filled his heart and life with childlike joy.  His acknowledgement is summed up in these words of his: “Late have I loved you, oh Beauty ever ancient, ever new.  Late have I loved you!”  The giant had given away to the child within.

Saint Thérèse of Lisieux was certainly not a giant.  Her life on earth ended after just 24 years.  But she, unlike Augustine, had the trust and faith of a child.  In fact, her entire plan of life was based on things a child could do.  She called it her Little Way.  Things that popped up during an ordinary day became offerings to God.  Just as a child will offer Mother a dropping dandelion with so much love that the simple “weed” is treasured as much as the gift of a dozen red roses, Thérese offered God very little things.

What kind of things did she give God?  Well, when the person behind her in church made a habit of dangling her rosary beads against the bench, Thérèse refrained from giving her a glance of annoyance.  Instead, she offered the clicking of those beads as a musical gift to God.  Tiny penance, you say?  Well, it probably happened three times a day 365 days a year!  She did not have any idea how widespread her influence would be.  To her, that would be a giant thing.  But it was not fantasy.

A reporter who was following Mother Teresa of Calcutta in India as she worked remarked, “I would not do what you are doing for a million dollars.”  Mother Teresa replied, “Neither would I.”  And she frequently told her Sisters, “Do little things with great love.”  That is what children do.  They are real.  The giants you may know are usually fantasy!

What little things could you do for God and your neighbor during Lent?  Try this.  On February 19, 2012, the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, make a list of all the little things that annoy you.  Then pick out ONE, only one.  (That will be hard enough to keep!)  Decide how you are going to handle that annoyance in a positive manner, for the love of God and your neighbor, or spouse, or child, or parent or co-worker.

Forget about giving up candy, or beer, or TV, or potato ships.  This will be much harder and much more beneficial to you AND much more pleasing to God.  Notice that the “how” phrase is printed in green above.  It is like a seed planted, and during Lent (40+ days and Sundays), you will have come close to forming a habit of handling that annoyance so that it annoys you less!  It will take root and blossom.  But you have to keep working at it for the 40+ days.  No days off!

“Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.   Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.  And whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me.” ~ Matthew 18:3-5

So, what, on Earth, are you doing for heaven’s sake?

Peace, joy, and everything good,

S. Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF

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Looking for a way to share Lenten resolutions with your children or grandchildren?  Check out this brief article on catholicculture.org – it shares more on St. Thérèse’s Little Way and how to make “sacrifice beads” for children.

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Sr. Sharonlu Sheridan, OSF has a background in education, child development, and family ministries.  She has worked as a teacher, school administrator, and as Director of Family Life Services for two dioceses.  Sr. Sharonlu has long been an advocate for children and puts her heart into helping parents build and sustain healthy family relationships.  One of her most memorable ministries has been with the people of Red Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota, where her heart still lies.

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Take a Lenten Journey with Us!

Join us for one of our upcoming programs at our Oldenburg Franciscan Center:

March 3 (Saturday) 9-11am
What Does it Mean to Be Salt of Earth?

With Sr. Karla Barker, OSF

Scripture tells us “We are the salt of Earth.”  How do we savor and at the same time add zest and excitement to the life we’ve been given?  Do we share our distinctive flavor so that others may relish our gentleness, creativity, and love of Earth?  Come learn to recognize and share more of your ‘saltiness’!

$25 for the morning (includes coffee/tea & danishes). 
RSVP to Annette at center@oldenburgosf.com or 812-933-6437.

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March 1, 8, 15, 22 (Thursdays) 6:30-8pm
Lenten Series: Four Contemporary Stories of Discovering One’s Way
with Sr. Barbara Leonhard, OSF.

Re-discover your call to discipleship!  During this Lenten series, we will look to four very real people who were drawn to discover and re-discover what discipleship was calling them to do.  Hearing their stories and the questions that would not let them go can prompt us to listen more closely to the call of discipleship in our own lives.  We will focus on one example per week:

March 1: Howard Thurman – a black minister, teacher, and mystic who established the first radically integrated intercultural church in the United States.

March 8: Edith Stein – a Jewish teacher, scholar, and mystic who became a Catholic and entered a Carmelite monastery.  She died in Auschwitz in 1942.

March 15: Thomas Kelly
– a Quaker teacher and seeker who discovered a mystical depth within himself and set about drawing others to their spiritual depths.

March 22: Jean Vanier
– Canadian founder of L’Arche Communities who has dedicated his life energies to creating homes and sharing life with those with developmental disabilities.

$15/session or $50 for the complete Lenten series. 
Or, come one evening and bring a friend, 2 for $25.
RSVP to Annette at center@oldenburgosf.com or 812-933-6437.

We hope to see you soon!